Publications de Boubakari GANSONRE (5)

Transcript of Obama’s Speech in Berlin

In a wide-ranging foreign-policy speech in Berlin, President Barack Obama called for launching negotiations with Russia aimed at ending the two nations’ Cold War military posture and a reduction of n...uclear arms by up to one third. Here is the text of the speech, as provided by the White House.

REMARKS BY PRESIDENT OBAMA AT THE BRANDENBURG GATE

Pariser Platz, Brandenburg Gate

Berlin, Germany

3:29 P.M. CEST

PRESIDENT OBAMA: Hello, Berlin! (Applause.) Thank you, Chancellor Merkel, for your leadership, your friendship, and the example of your life — from a child of the East to the leader of a free and united Germany.

As I’ve said, Angela and I don’t exactly look like previous German and American leaders. But the fact that we can stand here today, along the fault line where a city was divided, speaks to an eternal truth: No wall can stand against the yearning of justice, the yearnings for freedom, the yearnings for peace that burns in the human heart. (Applause.)

Mayor Wowereit, distinguished guests, and especially the people of Berlin and of Germany — thank you for this extraordinarily warm welcome. In fact, it’s so warm and I feel so good that I’m actually going to take off my jacket, and anybody else who wants to, feel free to. (Applause.) We can be a little more informal among friends. (Applause.)

As your Chancellor mentioned, five years ago I had the privilege to address this city as senator. Today, I’m proud to return as President of the United States. (Applause.) And I bring with me the enduring friendship of the American people, as well as my wife, Michelle, and Malia and Sasha. (Applause.) You may notice that they’re not here. The last thing they want to do is to listen to another speech from me. (Laughter.) So they’re out experiencing the beauty and the history of Berlin. And this history speaks to us today.

Here, for thousands of years, the people of this land have journeyed from tribe to principality to nation-state; through Reformation and Enlightenment, renowned as a “land of poets and thinkers,” among them Immanuel Kant, who taught us that freedom is the “unoriginated birthright of man, and it belongs to him by force of his humanity.”

Here, for two centuries, this gate stood tall as the world around it convulsed — through the rise and fall of empires; through revolutions and republics; art and music and science that reflected the height of human endeavor, but also war and carnage that exposed the depths of man’s cruelty to man.

It was here that Berliners carved out an island of democracy against the greatest of odds. As has already been mentioned, they were supported by an airlift of hope, and we are so honored to be joined by Colonel Halvorsen, 92 years old — the original “candy bomber.” We could not be prouder of him. (Applause.) I hope I look that good, by the way, when I’m 92. (Laughter.)

During that time, a Marshall Plan seeded a miracle, and a North Atlantic Alliance protected our people. And those in the neighborhoods and nations to the East drew strength from the knowledge that freedom was possible here, in Berlin — that the waves of crackdowns and suppressions might therefore someday be overcome.

Today, 60 years after they rose up against oppression, we remember the East German heroes of June 17th. When the wall finally came down, it was their dreams that were fulfilled. Their strength and their passion, their enduring example remind us that for all the power of militaries, for all the authority of governments, it is citizens who choose whether to be defined by a wall, or whether to tear it down. (Applause.)

And we’re now surrounded by the symbols of a Germany reborn. A rebuilt Reichstag and its glistening glass dome. An American embassy back at its historic home on Pariser Platz. (Applause.) And this square itself, once a desolate no man’s land, is now open to all. So while I am not the first American President to come to this gate, I am proud to stand on its Eastern side to pay tribute to the past. (Applause.)

For throughout all this history, the fate of this city came down to a simple question: Will we live free or in chains? Under governments that uphold our universal rights, or regimes that suppress them? In open societies that respect the sanctity of the individual and our free will, or in closed societies that suffocate the soul?

As free peoples, we stated our convictions long ago. As Americans, we believe that “all men are created equal” with the right to life and liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. And as Germans, you declared in your Basic Law that “the dignity of man is inviolable.” (Applause.) Around the world, nations have pledged themselves to a Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which recognizes the inherent dignity and rights of all members of our human family.

And this is what was at stake here in Berlin all those years. And because courageous crowds climbed atop that wall, because corrupt dictatorships gave way to new democracies, because millions across this continent now breathe the fresh air of freedom, we can say, here in Berlin, here in Europe — our values won. Openness won. Tolerance won. And freedom won here in Berlin. (Applause.)

And yet, more than two decades after that triumph, we must acknowledge that there can, at times, be a complacency among our Western democracies. Today, people often come together in places like this to remember history — not to make it. After all, we face no concrete walls, no barbed wire. There are no tanks poised across a border. There are no visits to fallout shelters. And so sometimes there can be a sense that the great challenges have somehow passed. And that brings with it a temptation to turn inward — to think of our own pursuits, and not the sweep of history; to believe that we’ve settled history’s accounts, that we can simply enjoy the fruits won by our forebears.

But I come here today, Berlin, to say complacency is not the character of great nations. Today’s threats are not as stark as they were half a century ago, but the struggle for freedom and security and human dignity — that struggle goes on. And I’ve come here, to this city of hope, because the tests of our time demand the same fighting spirit that defined Berlin a half-century ago.

Chancellor Merkel mentioned that we mark the anniversary of President John F. Kennedy’s stirring defense of freedom, embodied in the people of this great city. His pledge of solidarity — “Ich bin ein Berliner” — (applause) — echoes through the ages. But that’s not all that he said that day. Less remembered is the challenge that he issued to the crowd before him: “Let me ask you,” he said to those Berliners, “let me ask you to lift your eyes beyond the dangers of today” and “beyond the freedom of merely this city.” Look, he said, “to the day of peace with justice, beyond yourselves and ourselves to all mankind.”

President Kennedy was taken from us less than six months after he spoke those words. And like so many who died in those decades of division, he did not live to see Berlin united and free. Instead, he lives forever as a young man in our memory. But his words are timeless because they call upon us to care more about things than just our own self-comfort, about our own city, about our own country. They demand that we embrace the common endeavor of all humanity.

And if we lift our eyes, as President Kennedy called us to do, then we’ll recognize that our work is not yet done. For we are not only citizens of America or Germany — we are also citizens of the world. And our fates and fortunes are linked like never before.

We may no longer live in fear of global annihilation, but so long as nuclear weapons exist, we are not truly safe. (Applause.) We may strike blows against terrorist networks, but if we ignore the instability and intolerance that fuels extremism, our own freedom will eventually be endangered. We may enjoy a standard of living that is the envy of the world, but so long as hundreds of millions endure the agony of an empty stomach or the anguish of unemployment, we’re not truly prosperous. (Applause.)

I say all this here, in the heart of Europe, because our shared past shows that none of these challenges can be met unless we see ourselves as part of something bigger than our own experience. Our alliance is the foundation of global security. Our trade and our commerce is the engine of our global economy. Our values call upon us to care about the lives of people we will never meet. When Europe and America lead with our hopes instead of our fears, we do things that no other nations can do, no other nations will do. So we have to lift up our eyes today and consider the day of peace with justice that our generation wants for this world.

I’d suggest that peace with justice begins with the example we set here at home, for we know from our own histories that intolerance breeds injustice. Whether it’s based on race, or religion, gender or sexual orientation, we are stronger when all our people — no matter who they are or what they look like — are granted opportunity, and when our wives and our daughters have the same opportunities as our husbands and our sons. (Applause.)

When we respect the faiths practiced in our churches and synagogues, our mosques and our temples, we’re more secure. When we welcome the immigrant with his talents or her dreams, we are renewed. (Applause.) When we stand up for our gay and lesbian brothers and sisters and treat their love and their rights equally under the law, we defend our own liberty as well. We are more free when all people can pursue their own happiness. (Applause.) And as long as walls exist in our hearts to separate us from those who don’t look like us, or think like us, or worship as we do, then we’re going to have to work harder, together, to bring those walls of division down.

Peace with justice means free enterprise that unleashes the talents and creativity that reside in each of us; in other models, direct economic growth from the top down or relies solely on the resources extracted from the earth. But we believe that real prosperity comes from our most precious resource — our people. And that’s why we choose to invest in education, and science and research. (Applause.)

And now, as we emerge from recession, we must not avert our eyes from the insult of widening inequality, or the pain of youth who are unemployed. We have to build new ladders of opportunity in our own societies that — even as we pursue new trade and investment that fuels growth across the Atlantic.



America will stand with Europe as you strengthen your union. And we want to work with you to make sure that every person can enjoy the dignity that comes from work — whether they live in Chicago or Cleveland or Belfast or Berlin, in Athens or Madrid, everybody deserves opportunity. We have to have economies that are working for all people, not just those at the very top. (Applause.)

Peace with justice means extending a hand to those who reach for freedom, wherever they live. Different peoples and cultures will follow their own path, but we must reject the lie that those who live in distant places don’t yearn for freedom and self-determination just like we do; that they don’t somehow yearn for dignity and rule of law just like we do. We cannot dictate the pace of change in places like the Arab world, but we must reject the excuse that we can do nothing to support it. (Applause.)

We cannot shrink from our role of advancing the values we believe in — whether it’s supporting Afghans as they take responsibility for their future, or working for an Israeli-Palestinian peace — (applause) — or engaging as we’ve done in Burma to help create space for brave people to emerge from decades of dictatorship. In this century, these are the citizens who long to join the free world. They are who you were. They deserve our support, for they too, in their own way, are citizens of Berlin. And we have to help them every day. (Applause.)

Peace with justice means pursuing the security of a world without nuclear weapons — no matter how distant that dream may be. And so, as President, I’ve strengthened our efforts to stop the spread of nuclear weapons, and reduced the number and role of America’s nuclear weapons. Because of the New START Treaty, we’re on track to cut American and Russian deployed nuclear warheads to their lowest levels since the 1950s. (Applause.)

But we have more work to do. So today, I’m announcing additional steps forward. After a comprehensive review, I’ve determined that we can ensure the security of America and our allies, and maintain a strong and credible strategic deterrent, while reducing our deployed strategic nuclear weapons by up to one-third. And I intend to seek negotiated cuts with Russia to move beyond Cold War nuclear postures. (Applause.)

At the same time, we’ll work with our NATO allies to seek bold reductions in U.S. and Russian tactical weapons in Europe. And we can forge a new international framework for peaceful nuclear power, and reject the nuclear weaponization that North Korea and Iran may be seeking.

America will host a summit in 2016 to continue our efforts to secure nuclear materials around the world, and we will work to build support in the United States to ratify the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, and call on all nations to begin negotiations on a treaty that ends the production of fissile materials for nuclear weapons. These are steps we can take to create a world of peace with justice. (Applause.)

Peace with justice means refusing to condemn our children to a harsher, less hospitable planet. The effort to slow climate change requires bold action. And on this, Germany and Europe have led.

In the United States, we have recently doubled our renewable energy from clean sources like wind and solar power. We’re doubling fuel efficiency on our cars. Our dangerous carbon emissions have come down. But we know we have to do more — and we will do more. (Applause.)

With a global middle class consuming more energy every day, this must now be an effort of all nations, not just some. For the grim alternative affects all nations — more severe storms, more famine and floods, new waves of refugees, coastlines that vanish, oceans that rise. This is the future we must avert. This is the global threat of our time. And for the sake of future generations, our generation must move toward a global compact to confront a changing climate before it is too late. That is our job. That is our task. We have to get to work. (Applause.)

Peace with justice means meeting our moral obligations. And we have a moral obligation and a profound interest in helping lift the impoverished corners of the world. By promoting growth so we spare a child born today a lifetime of extreme poverty. By investing in agriculture, so we aren’t just sending food, but also teaching farmers to grow food. By strengthening public health, so we’re not just sending medicine, but training doctors and nurses who will help end the outrage of children dying from preventable diseases. Making sure that we do everything we can to realize the promise — an achievable promise — of the first AIDS-free generation. That is something that is possible if we feel a sufficient sense of urgency. (Applause.)

Our efforts have to be about more than just charity. They’re about new models of empowering people — to build institutions; to abandon the rot of corruption; to create ties of trade, not just aid, both with the West and among the nations they’re seeking to rise and increase their capacity. Because when they succeed, we will be more successful as well. Our fates are linked, and we cannot ignore those who are yearning not only for freedom but also prosperity.

And finally, let’s remember that peace with justice depends on our ability to sustain both the security of our societies and the openness that defines them. Threats to freedom don’t merely come from the outside. They can emerge from within — from our own fears, from the disengagement of our citizens.

For over a decade, America has been at war. Yet much has now changed over the five years since I last spoke here in Berlin. The Iraq war is now over. The Afghan war is coming to an end. Osama bin Laden is no more. Our efforts against al Qaeda are evolving.

And given these changes, last month, I spoke about America’s efforts against terrorism. And I drew inspiration from one of our founding fathers, James Madison, who wrote, “No nation could preserve its freedom in the midst of continual warfare.” James Madison is right — which is why, even as we remain vigilant about the threat of terrorism, we must move beyond a mindset of perpetual war. And in America, that means redoubling our efforts to close the prison at Guantanamo. (Applause.) It means tightly controlling our use of new technologies like drones. It means balancing the pursuit of security with the protection of privacy. (Applause.)

And I’m confident that that balance can be struck. I’m confident of that, and I’m confident that working with Germany, we can keep each other safe while at the same time maintaining those essential values for which we fought for.

Our current programs are bound by the rule of law, and they’re focused on threats to our security — not the communications of ordinary persons. They help confront real dangers, and they keep people safe here in the United States and here in Europe. But we must accept the challenge that all of us in democratic governments face: to listen to the voices who disagree with us; to have an open debate about how we use our powers and how we must constrain them; and to always remember that government exists to serve the power of the individual, and not the other way around. That’s what makes us who we are, and that’s what makes us different from those on the other side of the wall. (Applause.)

That is how we’ll stay true to our better history while reaching for the day of peace and justice that is to come. These are the beliefs that guide us, the values that inspire us, the principles that bind us together as free peoples who still believe the words of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. — that “injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” (Applause.)

And we should ask, should anyone ask if our generation has the courage to meet these tests? If anybody asks if President Kennedy’s words ring true today, let them come to Berlin, for here they will find the people who emerged from the ruins of war to reap the blessings of peace; from the pain of division to the joy of reunification. And here, they will recall how people trapped behind a wall braved bullets, and jumped barbed wire, and dashed across minefields, and dug through tunnels, and leapt from buildings, and swam across the Spree to claim their most basic right of freedom. (Applause.)

The wall belongs to history. But we have history to make as well. And the heroes that came before us now call to us to live up to those highest ideals — to care for the young people who can’t find a job in our own countries, and the girls who aren’t allowed to go to school overseas; to be vigilant in safeguarding our own freedoms, but also to extend a hand to those who are reaching for freedom abroad.

This is the lesson of the ages. This is the spirit of Berlin. And the greatest tribute that we can pay to those who came before us is by carrying on their work to pursue peace and justice not only in our countries but for all mankind.

Vielen Dank. (Applause.) God bless you. God bless the peoples of Germany. And God bless the United States of America. Thank you very much. (Applause.)

END 3:58 P.M. CEST

Lire la suite...

Transcript of Obama’s Speech in Berlin

In a wide-ranging foreign-policy speech in Berlin, President Barack Obama called for launching negotiations with Russia aimed at ending the two nations’ Cold War military posture and a reduction of n...uclear arms by up to one third. Here is the text of the speech, as provided by the White House.

REMARKS BY PRESIDENT OBAMA AT THE BRANDENBURG GATE

Pariser Platz, Brandenburg Gate

Berlin, Germany

3:29 P.M. CEST

PRESIDENT OBAMA: Hello, Berlin! (Applause.) Thank you, Chancellor Merkel, for your leadership, your friendship, and the example of your life — from a child of the East to the leader of a free and united Germany.

As I’ve said, Angela and I don’t exactly look like previous German and American leaders. But the fact that we can stand here today, along the fault line where a city was divided, speaks to an eternal truth: No wall can stand against the yearning of justice, the yearnings for freedom, the yearnings for peace that burns in the human heart. (Applause.)

Mayor Wowereit, distinguished guests, and especially the people of Berlin and of Germany — thank you for this extraordinarily warm welcome. In fact, it’s so warm and I feel so good that I’m actually going to take off my jacket, and anybody else who wants to, feel free to. (Applause.) We can be a little more informal among friends. (Applause.)

As your Chancellor mentioned, five years ago I had the privilege to address this city as senator. Today, I’m proud to return as President of the United States. (Applause.) And I bring with me the enduring friendship of the American people, as well as my wife, Michelle, and Malia and Sasha. (Applause.) You may notice that they’re not here. The last thing they want to do is to listen to another speech from me. (Laughter.) So they’re out experiencing the beauty and the history of Berlin. And this history speaks to us today.

Here, for thousands of years, the people of this land have journeyed from tribe to principality to nation-state; through Reformation and Enlightenment, renowned as a “land of poets and thinkers,” among them Immanuel Kant, who taught us that freedom is the “unoriginated birthright of man, and it belongs to him by force of his humanity.”

Here, for two centuries, this gate stood tall as the world around it convulsed — through the rise and fall of empires; through revolutions and republics; art and music and science that reflected the height of human endeavor, but also war and carnage that exposed the depths of man’s cruelty to man.

It was here that Berliners carved out an island of democracy against the greatest of odds. As has already been mentioned, they were supported by an airlift of hope, and we are so honored to be joined by Colonel Halvorsen, 92 years old — the original “candy bomber.” We could not be prouder of him. (Applause.) I hope I look that good, by the way, when I’m 92. (Laughter.)

During that time, a Marshall Plan seeded a miracle, and a North Atlantic Alliance protected our people. And those in the neighborhoods and nations to the East drew strength from the knowledge that freedom was possible here, in Berlin — that the waves of crackdowns and suppressions might therefore someday be overcome.

Today, 60 years after they rose up against oppression, we remember the East German heroes of June 17th. When the wall finally came down, it was their dreams that were fulfilled. Their strength and their passion, their enduring example remind us that for all the power of militaries, for all the authority of governments, it is citizens who choose whether to be defined by a wall, or whether to tear it down. (Applause.)

And we’re now surrounded by the symbols of a Germany reborn. A rebuilt Reichstag and its glistening glass dome. An American embassy back at its historic home on Pariser Platz. (Applause.) And this square itself, once a desolate no man’s land, is now open to all. So while I am not the first American President to come to this gate, I am proud to stand on its Eastern side to pay tribute to the past. (Applause.)

For throughout all this history, the fate of this city came down to a simple question: Will we live free or in chains? Under governments that uphold our universal rights, or regimes that suppress them? In open societies that respect the sanctity of the individual and our free will, or in closed societies that suffocate the soul?

As free peoples, we stated our convictions long ago. As Americans, we believe that “all men are created equal” with the right to life and liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. And as Germans, you declared in your Basic Law that “the dignity of man is inviolable.” (Applause.) Around the world, nations have pledged themselves to a Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which recognizes the inherent dignity and rights of all members of our human family.

And this is what was at stake here in Berlin all those years. And because courageous crowds climbed atop that wall, because corrupt dictatorships gave way to new democracies, because millions across this continent now breathe the fresh air of freedom, we can say, here in Berlin, here in Europe — our values won. Openness won. Tolerance won. And freedom won here in Berlin. (Applause.)

And yet, more than two decades after that triumph, we must acknowledge that there can, at times, be a complacency among our Western democracies. Today, people often come together in places like this to remember history — not to make it. After all, we face no concrete walls, no barbed wire. There are no tanks poised across a border. There are no visits to fallout shelters. And so sometimes there can be a sense that the great challenges have somehow passed. And that brings with it a temptation to turn inward — to think of our own pursuits, and not the sweep of history; to believe that we’ve settled history’s accounts, that we can simply enjoy the fruits won by our forebears.

But I come here today, Berlin, to say complacency is not the character of great nations. Today’s threats are not as stark as they were half a century ago, but the struggle for freedom and security and human dignity — that struggle goes on. And I’ve come here, to this city of hope, because the tests of our time demand the same fighting spirit that defined Berlin a half-century ago.

Chancellor Merkel mentioned that we mark the anniversary of President John F. Kennedy’s stirring defense of freedom, embodied in the people of this great city. His pledge of solidarity — “Ich bin ein Berliner” — (applause) — echoes through the ages. But that’s not all that he said that day. Less remembered is the challenge that he issued to the crowd before him: “Let me ask you,” he said to those Berliners, “let me ask you to lift your eyes beyond the dangers of today” and “beyond the freedom of merely this city.” Look, he said, “to the day of peace with justice, beyond yourselves and ourselves to all mankind.”

President Kennedy was taken from us less than six months after he spoke those words. And like so many who died in those decades of division, he did not live to see Berlin united and free. Instead, he lives forever as a young man in our memory. But his words are timeless because they call upon us to care more about things than just our own self-comfort, about our own city, about our own country. They demand that we embrace the common endeavor of all humanity.

And if we lift our eyes, as President Kennedy called us to do, then we’ll recognize that our work is not yet done. For we are not only citizens of America or Germany — we are also citizens of the world. And our fates and fortunes are linked like never before.

We may no longer live in fear of global annihilation, but so long as nuclear weapons exist, we are not truly safe. (Applause.) We may strike blows against terrorist networks, but if we ignore the instability and intolerance that fuels extremism, our own freedom will eventually be endangered. We may enjoy a standard of living that is the envy of the world, but so long as hundreds of millions endure the agony of an empty stomach or the anguish of unemployment, we’re not truly prosperous. (Applause.)

I say all this here, in the heart of Europe, because our shared past shows that none of these challenges can be met unless we see ourselves as part of something bigger than our own experience. Our alliance is the foundation of global security. Our trade and our commerce is the engine of our global economy. Our values call upon us to care about the lives of people we will never meet. When Europe and America lead with our hopes instead of our fears, we do things that no other nations can do, no other nations will do. So we have to lift up our eyes today and consider the day of peace with justice that our generation wants for this world.

I’d suggest that peace with justice begins with the example we set here at home, for we know from our own histories that intolerance breeds injustice. Whether it’s based on race, or religion, gender or sexual orientation, we are stronger when all our people — no matter who they are or what they look like — are granted opportunity, and when our wives and our daughters have the same opportunities as our husbands and our sons. (Applause.)

When we respect the faiths practiced in our churches and synagogues, our mosques and our temples, we’re more secure. When we welcome the immigrant with his talents or her dreams, we are renewed. (Applause.) When we stand up for our gay and lesbian brothers and sisters and treat their love and their rights equally under the law, we defend our own liberty as well. We are more free when all people can pursue their own happiness. (Applause.) And as long as walls exist in our hearts to separate us from those who don’t look like us, or think like us, or worship as we do, then we’re going to have to work harder, together, to bring those walls of division down.

Peace with justice means free enterprise that unleashes the talents and creativity that reside in each of us; in other models, direct economic growth from the top down or relies solely on the resources extracted from the earth. But we believe that real prosperity comes from our most precious resource — our people. And that’s why we choose to invest in education, and science and research. (Applause.)

And now, as we emerge from recession, we must not avert our eyes from the insult of widening inequality, or the pain of youth who are unemployed. We have to build new ladders of opportunity in our own societies that — even as we pursue new trade and investment that fuels growth across the Atlantic.



America will stand with Europe as you strengthen your union. And we want to work with you to make sure that every person can enjoy the dignity that comes from work — whether they live in Chicago or Cleveland or Belfast or Berlin, in Athens or Madrid, everybody deserves opportunity. We have to have economies that are working for all people, not just those at the very top. (Applause.)

Peace with justice means extending a hand to those who reach for freedom, wherever they live. Different peoples and cultures will follow their own path, but we must reject the lie that those who live in distant places don’t yearn for freedom and self-determination just like we do; that they don’t somehow yearn for dignity and rule of law just like we do. We cannot dictate the pace of change in places like the Arab world, but we must reject the excuse that we can do nothing to support it. (Applause.)

We cannot shrink from our role of advancing the values we believe in — whether it’s supporting Afghans as they take responsibility for their future, or working for an Israeli-Palestinian peace — (applause) — or engaging as we’ve done in Burma to help create space for brave people to emerge from decades of dictatorship. In this century, these are the citizens who long to join the free world. They are who you were. They deserve our support, for they too, in their own way, are citizens of Berlin. And we have to help them every day. (Applause.)

Peace with justice means pursuing the security of a world without nuclear weapons — no matter how distant that dream may be. And so, as President, I’ve strengthened our efforts to stop the spread of nuclear weapons, and reduced the number and role of America’s nuclear weapons. Because of the New START Treaty, we’re on track to cut American and Russian deployed nuclear warheads to their lowest levels since the 1950s. (Applause.)

But we have more work to do. So today, I’m announcing additional steps forward. After a comprehensive review, I’ve determined that we can ensure the security of America and our allies, and maintain a strong and credible strategic deterrent, while reducing our deployed strategic nuclear weapons by up to one-third. And I intend to seek negotiated cuts with Russia to move beyond Cold War nuclear postures. (Applause.)

At the same time, we’ll work with our NATO allies to seek bold reductions in U.S. and Russian tactical weapons in Europe. And we can forge a new international framework for peaceful nuclear power, and reject the nuclear weaponization that North Korea and Iran may be seeking.

America will host a summit in 2016 to continue our efforts to secure nuclear materials around the world, and we will work to build support in the United States to ratify the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, and call on all nations to begin negotiations on a treaty that ends the production of fissile materials for nuclear weapons. These are steps we can take to create a world of peace with justice. (Applause.)

Peace with justice means refusing to condemn our children to a harsher, less hospitable planet. The effort to slow climate change requires bold action. And on this, Germany and Europe have led.

In the United States, we have recently doubled our renewable energy from clean sources like wind and solar power. We’re doubling fuel efficiency on our cars. Our dangerous carbon emissions have come down. But we know we have to do more — and we will do more. (Applause.)

With a global middle class consuming more energy every day, this must now be an effort of all nations, not just some. For the grim alternative affects all nations — more severe storms, more famine and floods, new waves of refugees, coastlines that vanish, oceans that rise. This is the future we must avert. This is the global threat of our time. And for the sake of future generations, our generation must move toward a global compact to confront a changing climate before it is too late. That is our job. That is our task. We have to get to work. (Applause.)

Peace with justice means meeting our moral obligations. And we have a moral obligation and a profound interest in helping lift the impoverished corners of the world. By promoting growth so we spare a child born today a lifetime of extreme poverty. By investing in agriculture, so we aren’t just sending food, but also teaching farmers to grow food. By strengthening public health, so we’re not just sending medicine, but training doctors and nurses who will help end the outrage of children dying from preventable diseases. Making sure that we do everything we can to realize the promise — an achievable promise — of the first AIDS-free generation. That is something that is possible if we feel a sufficient sense of urgency. (Applause.)

Our efforts have to be about more than just charity. They’re about new models of empowering people — to build institutions; to abandon the rot of corruption; to create ties of trade, not just aid, both with the West and among the nations they’re seeking to rise and increase their capacity. Because when they succeed, we will be more successful as well. Our fates are linked, and we cannot ignore those who are yearning not only for freedom but also prosperity.

And finally, let’s remember that peace with justice depends on our ability to sustain both the security of our societies and the openness that defines them. Threats to freedom don’t merely come from the outside. They can emerge from within — from our own fears, from the disengagement of our citizens.

For over a decade, America has been at war. Yet much has now changed over the five years since I last spoke here in Berlin. The Iraq war is now over. The Afghan war is coming to an end. Osama bin Laden is no more. Our efforts against al Qaeda are evolving.

And given these changes, last month, I spoke about America’s efforts against terrorism. And I drew inspiration from one of our founding fathers, James Madison, who wrote, “No nation could preserve its freedom in the midst of continual warfare.” James Madison is right — which is why, even as we remain vigilant about the threat of terrorism, we must move beyond a mindset of perpetual war. And in America, that means redoubling our efforts to close the prison at Guantanamo. (Applause.) It means tightly controlling our use of new technologies like drones. It means balancing the pursuit of security with the protection of privacy. (Applause.)

And I’m confident that that balance can be struck. I’m confident of that, and I’m confident that working with Germany, we can keep each other safe while at the same time maintaining those essential values for which we fought for.

Our current programs are bound by the rule of law, and they’re focused on threats to our security — not the communications of ordinary persons. They help confront real dangers, and they keep people safe here in the United States and here in Europe. But we must accept the challenge that all of us in democratic governments face: to listen to the voices who disagree with us; to have an open debate about how we use our powers and how we must constrain them; and to always remember that government exists to serve the power of the individual, and not the other way around. That’s what makes us who we are, and that’s what makes us different from those on the other side of the wall. (Applause.)

That is how we’ll stay true to our better history while reaching for the day of peace and justice that is to come. These are the beliefs that guide us, the values that inspire us, the principles that bind us together as free peoples who still believe the words of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. — that “injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” (Applause.)

And we should ask, should anyone ask if our generation has the courage to meet these tests? If anybody asks if President Kennedy’s words ring true today, let them come to Berlin, for here they will find the people who emerged from the ruins of war to reap the blessings of peace; from the pain of division to the joy of reunification. And here, they will recall how people trapped behind a wall braved bullets, and jumped barbed wire, and dashed across minefields, and dug through tunnels, and leapt from buildings, and swam across the Spree to claim their most basic right of freedom. (Applause.)

The wall belongs to history. But we have history to make as well. And the heroes that came before us now call to us to live up to those highest ideals — to care for the young people who can’t find a job in our own countries, and the girls who aren’t allowed to go to school overseas; to be vigilant in safeguarding our own freedoms, but also to extend a hand to those who are reaching for freedom abroad.

This is the lesson of the ages. This is the spirit of Berlin. And the greatest tribute that we can pay to those who came before us is by carrying on their work to pursue peace and justice not only in our countries but for all mankind.

Vielen Dank. (Applause.) God bless you. God bless the peoples of Germany. And God bless the United States of America. Thank you very much. (Applause.)

END 3:58 P.M. CEST

 

Lire la suite...

Après en avoir reçu la confirmation par ses services de renseignement, le président américain John F. Kennedy informe ses compatriotes de la présence de missiles soviétiques à Cuba. Dans son discours prononcé à la télévision américaine, Kennedy s’adresse à la nation et au monde, exigeant de l’Union des Républiques Socialistes Soviétiques (URSS) qu’elle retire les missiles de Cuba. Cet événement est souvent identifié comme le paroxysme de la Guerre froide. Voici le discours intégral de John Fitzgerald Kennedy, le 22 octobre 1962, sur la crise des missiles de Cuba.

Bonsoir mes compatriotes,

Fidèle à sa promesse, le gouvernement a continué de surveiller de très près les préparatifs militaires soviétiques à Cuba. Au cours de la dernière semaine, nous avons eu des preuves incontestables de la construction de plusieurs bases de fusées dans cette île opprimée. Ces sites de lancement ne peuvent avoir qu’un but : la constitution d’un potentiel nucléaire dirigé contre l’hémisphère occidental.

Les caractéristiques de ces nouvelles rampes de lancement pour missiles se rapportent à deux types d’installations distincts. Plusieurs de ces bases sont dotées de missiles balistiques de portée moyenne, capables de transporter une tête atomique à quelque deux mille kilomètres. Ce qui signifie que chacune de ces fusées peut atteindre Washington, le canal de Panama, cap Canaveral, Mexico ou tout autre ville située dans le sud-est des Etats-Unis, en Amérique centrale ou dans la région des Caraïbes.
D’autres bases en cours d’achèvement paraissent destinées à recevoir des missiles à portée dite intermédiaire capables de parcourir largement le double de cette distance, donc d’atteindre la plupart de nos grandes villes de l’hémisphère occidental, du nord de la baie d’Hudson au Canada jusqu’à une ville aussi méridionale que Lima, au Pérou. En outre, des bombardiers à réaction, qui peuvent transporter des armes nucléaires, sont en voie d’assemblage à Cuba, tandis que l’on y prépare des bases aériennes adéquates.

Cette transformation précipitée de Cuba en importante base stratégique, par suite de la présence de ces puissantes armes offensives à long rayon d’action et qui ont des effets de destruction massive, constitue une menace précise à la paix et à la sécurité de toutes les Amériques. Elles font délibérément fi, et d’une façon flagrante, du pacte de Rio de 1947, des traditions de cette nation et de cet hémisphère, de la résolution conjointe prise par le 87e congrès, de la charte des Nations unies et de mes propres mises en garde publiques aux Soviétiques les 4 et 13 septembre.

Cette action est également en contradiction avec les assurances réitérées données par les porte-paroles soviétiques, tant en public qu’en privé, selon lesquelles l’installation d’armements à Cuba ne revêtirait que le caractère défensif prévu à l’origine, et que l’Union soviétique n’a aucun besoin, ni aucun désir d’installer des missiles stratégiques sur le sol d’une autre nation.

L’ampleur de cette entreprise prouve clairement qu’elle a été mise au point depuis plusieurs mois. Cependant, le mois dernier encore, à peine avais-je fait la distinction entre l’installation éventuelle de missiles terre-terre et l’existence de missiles anti-aériens défensifs, le gouvernement soviétique avait déclaré publiquement le 11 septembre que « l’armement et l’équipement militaire expédiés à Cuba sont exclusivement destinés à des fins défensives », que « l’Union soviétique n’a aucun besoin de transférer ses armes, en vue de représailles contre un pays, dans un pays comme Cuba par exemple », et que « l’Union soviétique dispose de fusées tellement puissantes, capables de porter ses ogives nucléaires, qu’il est absolument inutile de rechercher des bases de lancement en dehors du territoire soviétique ». Cette déclaration était fausse.

Jeudi dernier encore, alors que je disposais de preuves irréfutables de l’accélération de ce dispositif offensif, le ministre soviétique des Affaires étrangères, M. Gromyko, me déclarait dans mon bureau qu’il avait reçu instruction d’affirmer une fois de plus comme, disait-il, son gouvernement l’avait déjà fait, que l’aide soviétique à Cuba « n’avait pour seul but que de contribuer aux moyens de défense de Cuba », que « l’entraînement par des spécialistes soviétiques des nationaux cubains dans le maniement d’armements défensifs ne revêtait aucun caractère offensif « , et que « s’il en était autrement le gouvernement soviétique ne se serait jamais laissé entraîner à prêter une telle assistance ». Cette déclaration était également fausse.

Ni les Etats-Unis d’Amérique ni la communauté mondiale des nations ne peuvent tolérer une duperie délibérée et des menaces offensives de la part d’une quelconque puissance, petite ou grande. Nous ne vivons plus dans un monde où seule la mise à feu d’armes constitue une provocation suffisante envers la sécurité d’une nation et constitue un péril maximum. Les armes nucléaires sont tellement destructrices, et les engins balistiques sont tellement rapides, que tout accroissement substantiel dans les moyens de les utiliser, ou que tout changement subit de leur emplacement peut parfaitement être considéré comme une menace précise à la paix.

Durant plusieurs années, l’Union soviétique, de même que les Etats-Unis – conscients de ce fait – ont installé leurs armements nucléaires stratégiques avec grand soin, de façon à ne jamais mettre en danger le statu quo précaire qui garantissait que ces armements ne seraient pas utilisés autrement qu’en cas de provocation mettant notre vie en jeu. Nos propres missiles stratégiques n’ont jamais été transférés sur le sol d’aucune autre nation sous un voile de mystère et de tromperie, et notre histoire – contrairement à celle des Soviétiques depuis la Deuxième guerre mondiale – a bien prouvé que nous n’avons aucun désir de dominer ou de conquérir aucune autre nation ou d’imposer un système à son peuple. Il n’empêche que les citoyens américains se sont habitués à vivre quotidiennement sous la menace des missiles soviétiques installés sur le territoire de l’URSS ou bien embarqués à bord de sous-marins.

Dans ce contexte les armes qui sont à Cuba ne font qu’aggraver un danger évident et actuel – bien qu’il faille prendre note du fait que les nations d’Amérique latine n’ont jamais jusqu’à présent été soumise à une menace nucléaire en puissance.

Mais cette implantation secrète, rapide et extraordinaire de missiles communistes dans une région bien connue comme ayant un lien particulier et historique avec les Etats-Unis et les pays de l’hémisphère occidental, en violation des assurances soviétiques et au mépris de la politique américaine et de celle de l’hémisphère – cette décision soudaine et clandestine d’implanter pour la première fois des armes stratégiques hors du sol soviétique – constitue une modification délibérément provocatrice et injustifiée du statu quo, qui ne peut être acceptée par notre pays si nous voulons que notre courage et nos engagements soient reconnus comme valables par nos amis comme par nos ennemis.

Les années 30 nous ont enseigné une leçon claire : les menées agressives, si on leur permet de s’intensifier sans contrôle et sans contestation, mènent finalement à la guerre. Notre pays est contre la guerre. Nous sommes également fidèles à notre parole. Notre détermination inébranlable doit donc être d’empêcher l’utilisation de ces missiles contre notre pays ou n’importe quel autre , et d’obtenir leur retrait de l’hémisphère occidental.

Notre politique a été marquée par la patience et la réserve. Nous avons fait en sorte de ne pas nous laisser distraire de nos objectifs principaux par de simples causes d’irritation ou des actions de fanatiques. Mais aujourd’hui il nous faut prendre de nouvelles initiatives – c’est ce que nous faisons et celles-ci ne constitueront peut-être qu’un début. Nous ne risquerons pas prématurément ou sans nécessité le coût d’une guerre nucléaire mondiale dans laquelle même les fruits de la victoire n’auraient dans notre bouche qu’un goût de cendre, mais nous ne nous déroberons pas devant ce risque, à quelque moment que nous ayons à y faire face.

Premièrement : Pour empêcher la mise en place d’un dispositif offensif, une stricte »quarantaine » sera appliquée sur tout équipement militaire offensif à destination de Cuba. Tous les bateaux à destination de Cuba, quels que soient leur pavillon ou leur provenance seront interceptés et seront obligés de faire demi-tour s’ils transportent des armes offensives. Si besoin est, cette quarantaine sera appliquée également à d’autres types de marchandises et de navires. Pour le moment cependant, nous ne cherchons pas à priver la population cubaine des produits dont elle a besoin pour vivre, comme les Soviétiques tentèrent de le faire durant le blocus de Berlin en 1948.

Deuxièmement : J’ai donné des ordres pour que l’on établisse une surveillance étroite, permanente et plus étroite de Cuba et la mise en place d’un dispositif militaire.

Troisièmement : Toute fusée nucléaire lancée à partir de Cuba, contre l’une quelconque des nations de l’hémisphère occidental, sera considérée comme l’équivalent d’une attaque soviétique contre les Etats-Unis, attaque qui entraînerait des représailles massives contre l’Union soviétique.

Quatrièmement : Comme précaution militaire impérieuse, j’ai renforcé notre base à Guantanomo.

Cinquièmement : Nous avons demandé ce soir la convocation immédiate de l’organisme de consultation des Etats américains, afin de prendre en considération cette menace à la sécurité du continent. Nos autres alliés de par le monde ont également été prévenus.

Sixièmement : Conformément à la Charte des Nations unies, nous demandons ce soir une réunion d’urgence du Conseil de Sécurité afin de répondre à la plus récente menace soviétique à la paix du monde. La résolution que nous nous proposons de soumettre consiste à prévoir le démantèlement rapide et le retrait de toutes les armes offensives de Cuba, sous le contrôle d’observateurs de l’ONU, avant que l’embargo ne puisse être levé.

Septièmement et finallement : Je fais appel à M. Khrouchtchev afin qu’il mette fin à cette menace clandestine, irresponsable et provocatrice à la paix du monde et au maintien de relations stables entre nos deux nations. Je lui demande d’abandonner cette politique de domination mondiale et de participer à un effort historique en vue de mettre fin à une périlleuse course aux armements et de transformer l’histoire de l’homme.

Le prix de la liberté est toujours élevé, mais l’Amérique a toujours payé ce prix. Et il est un seul chemin que nous ne suivrons jamais : celui de la capitulation et de la soumission. Notre but n’est pas la victoire de la force mais la défense du droit. Il n’est pas la paix aux dépens de la liberté, mais la paix et la liberté dans cet hémisphère et, nous l’espérons, dans le monde entier. Avec l’aide de Dieu, nous atteindrons ce but.

 

Lire la suite...

Excellence Monsieur John ASHE, Président de la 68ème session de l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies ;

Excellences Mesdames et Messieurs les Chefs d’Etat et de Gouvernement ;

Excellence Monsieur BAN  Ki-Moon, Secrétaire Général des Nations Unies ;
Mesdames et Messieurs ;

Honorables Délégués;

Monsieur le Président,

Tout comme les Chefs d’Etat et de gouvernement qui m’ont précédé à cette tribune, je voudrais à mon tour, au nom de la délégation de la Côte d’Ivoire et en mon nom propre, vous adresser nos chaleureuses félicitations pour votre brillante élection à la présidence de la 68ème session de l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies.

Je voudrais saluer tout particulièrement le Secrétaire Général des Nations Unies, Monsieur BAN Ki-Moon, pour son action à la tête de notre Organisation et son engagement pour la paix et le développement dans le monde.

Je saisis cette heureuse opportunité pour lui renouveler, au nom de mes pairs de la CEDEAO, notre gratitude pour son implication personnelle dans la résolution des conflits en Afrique et singulièrement dans la sous-région ouest africaine.

Monsieur le Président,

Excellences Mesdames et Messieurs,

Avant d’aborder le thème de cette session et au moment où j’interviens pour la seconde fois devant votre auguste assemblée, je tiens à vous renouveler la reconnaissance du peuple ivoirien pour l’action que les Nations Unies et la communauté internationale continuent de jouer à nos côtés. En effet, grâce à ce précieux soutien, la Côte d’Ivoire est au travail et a repris le chemin du développement économique et social, pour le bien-être de tous les Ivoiriens. Mon pays est en pleine reconstruction, après s’être doté d’Institutions crédibles et démocratiques au terme d’élections libres et transparentes. La réconciliation nationale et le dialogue politique  se poursuivent dans un climat apaisé. Nous sommes conscients des défis qui restent à relever mais nous sommes sur la bonne voie.

Monsieur le Président,

Le thème retenu par la présente session, à savoir « Le programme de développement de l’après 2015 : plantons le décor" nous interpelle tous, individuellement et collectivement, sur notre capacité à relever le défi du développement.

Alors que nous approchons de la date cible de 2015 pour la réalisation des Objectifs du Millénaire pour le Développement (OMD), il convient de souligner que d’importants  progrès ont été accomplis par la plupart des pays et de nous féliciter de la détermination de l’ensemble des Gouvernements à poursuivre leurs efforts, afin de tenir les engagements du Millénaire. Même si beaucoup reste encore à faire et que les progrès affichés peuvent masquer des réalités nationales et régionales diverses, la dynamique actuelle semble irréversible en dépit d’un contexte économique particulièrement difficile. Nous devons nous atteler à consolider les résultats positifs obtenus dans certains domaines comme la scolarisation dans le primaire, la couverture vaccinale et le ralentissement de la propagation du VIH/SIDA. Nous devons également  résoudre les questions de sécurité alimentaire, de sécheresse, d’accès à l’eau potable et de lutte contre la pauvreté, qui continuent d’être des sujets de préoccupation majeure pour nos Etats.

Monsieur le Président,

En adoptant les Objectifs du Millénaire pour le Développement, nous avons la responsabilité collective et l’ambition d’améliorer les conditions de vie de nos concitoyens et d’accélérer le développement de nos pays.  En ce qui concerne mon pays,  la Côte d’Ivoire, la réalisation des Objectifs du Millénaire pour le Développement (OMD) qui stagnait en raison de la crise socio-politique, connait aujourd’hui une dynamique nouvelle, grâce notamment aux bonnes performances de notre économie.

C’est dans ce climat favorable que le Gouvernement a mis en place un ambitieux programme de reconstruction, qui s’appuie sur  le  Plan National de Développement (PND) 2012-2015, et dans lequel les investissements sociaux occupent une place de choix.

Ainsi, ce programme accorde d’importants investissements aux domaines de l’enseignement, de la santé et des infrastructures sociales de base.

Le Gouvernement qui a également érigé au rang de priorité nationale la création d’emplois, notamment l’emploi  des jeunes,  souhaite atteindre l’objectif de  création  d'environ 200.000 emplois par an.

Monsieur le Président,

A l’heure du bilan, nous devons nous rendre à l’évidence que le monde a besoin davantage de solidarité pour atteindre les objectifs du Millénaire.

Il nous faut donc adopter une approche globale, qui permettra à nos pays de bâtir des modèles de développement durables, plus justes et respectueux de nos spécificités. 

Le continent africain qui affiche un retard par rapport à l’échéance de 2015, peut cependant compter sur son poids croissant dans l’économie mondiale.

C’est pour cela que mon pays adhère à la définition d’un agenda Post-2015, afin de forger un consensus nouveau autour d’une nouvelle génération d’Objectifs du Développement Durable, s’appuyant sur les Objectifs du Millénaire pour le Développement (OMD).

Monsieur le Président,

Le monde auquel nous aspirons ne sera possible que si nous relevons le défi de la paix et de la sécurité, mais aussi celui de la démocratie à travers le retour aux valeurs de la Charte des Nations Unies.

Trop de guerres et de conflits continuent de déchirer l’humanité et de miner les efforts de développement de nombreux pays. Nous devons collectivement y mettre fin, en privilégiant les seuls intérêts des peuples, grâce aux instruments dont nous nous sommes dotés. C’est en renouvelant les fondements de notre solidarité, que nous parviendrons à enrayer les nouvelles menaces telles que le terrorisme, la criminalité transfrontalière, le trafic de drogue et d’armes, la traite des êtres humains, la piraterie maritime.

L’assaut terroriste, d’une rare violence, qui a endeuillé le Kenya en est la manifestation et nous rappelle l’urgence d’une action collective contre cette menace. Nous condamnons avec la plus grande fermeté cet acte ignoble qui nous montre que la lutte contre le terrorisme est un combat sans répit, qui doit changer notre perception de la sécurité. Dans ces moments de grande douleur, je voudrais, au nom de mon pays et de l’Afrique de l’Ouest, témoigner au peuple frère du Kenya et à son Président, notre compassion et notre soutien.

Mesdames et Messieurs,

Honorables Délégués,

La Gouvernance internationale doit se démocratiser et incarner davantage le consensus universel et les valeurs de nos nations. En effet, le monde a besoin de se reconnaître dans ses institutions multilatérales afin de lutter efficacement contre les menaces de ce nouveau siècle.

L’Afrique de l’Ouest est consciente de la menace que fait peser sur son développement, la dégradation de l’environnement sécuritaire et la prolifération de nouveaux facteurs d’instabilité. C’est donc à juste titre que les Chefs d’Etats de la CEDEAO mettent tout en œuvre, avec détermination et avec  l’appui de la Communauté internationale, pour le rétablissement et la préservation de la paix dans la région.

C’est pourquoi nous avons accueilli avec une grande satisfaction le rétablissement  de l'intégrité territoriale du Mali et la bonne tenue de l’élection présidentielle dans ce pays frère.

Ces succès ne doivent toutefois pas cacher les énormes défis auxquels notre région reste confrontée.  

J’invite donc la communauté internationale à tirer les leçons du conflit au Mali et à soutenir la CEDEAO et l'Union Africaine dans la mise en place d’une politique de sécurité cohérente et proactive ; le terrorisme dans la région du Sahel se déplace à l’intérieur d’un espace dont des pans entiers échappent à l’autorité des Etats.

La menace dépasse les frontières du continent africain et appelle à une réponse internationale concertée à la hauteur des enjeux.

Monsieur le Président

Mesdames, Messieurs

J’encourage les bailleurs de fonds et nos partenaires traditionnels à apporter leur soutien aux Nations Unies et à nos Etats dans le cadre de cette stratégie.

Nous saluons l’annonce de la visite prochaine du Secrétaire général des Nations unies et du Président de la Banque Mondiale, dans la région du sahel afin de mobiliser l’ensemble de la Communauté internationale et des Institutions financières.

A présent, Mesdames et Messieurs,

Honorables Délégués,

Si nous voulons clore le cycle des crises politico-militaires en Afrique de l'Ouest, la Guinée Bissau devrait elle aussi bénéficier de la solidarité internationale. C'est à ce prix que nous pourrons consolider la transition inclusive actuelle et permettre au Gouvernement d’organiser des élections démocratiques en novembre prochain.

C’est pourquoi, au nom de la CEDEAO, j’invite la Communauté internationale à contribuer au financement des élections générales dans ce pays. 

Monsieur le Président,

Je voudrais pour conclure, rappeler à notre auguste assemblée, que pour relever les défis de la paix et la sécurité internationale, nous devons plus que jamais mettre en œuvre les engagements pris au cours des conférences et des réunions au Sommet des Nations Unies. Le droit au développement doit devenir une réalité pour tous, tel qu’énoncé dans la Déclaration du Millénaire, unanimement adoptée en Septembre 2000.

Nous devons tous tirer les leçons des insuffisances du passé, pour mieux construire un monde nouveau, que nous voulons radieux pour nous-mêmes,  pour nos enfants et pour nos petits-enfants.

Je vous remercie.

Lire la suite...

Au lendemain du coup d'Etat du 15 octobre 1987, SANKARA est accusé d'avoir voulu " à un moment de sa vie voulu" liquider Blaise Compaoré et ses alliés. Le discours suivant, montre bien que la thèse du sang n'a jamais été l'intention de SANKARA

Retrouvé par le journaliste Denis de Montgolfier que nous tenons à remercier ici, ce discours est de toute première importance.

Quelques rappels afin de bien analyser son contenu. La crise perdurait au sein du CNR. Sankara avait convoqué une réunion de l’OMR (Organisation des militaires révolutionnaires), le 15 octobre au soir où il devait prononcé ce discours. En effet peu de temps auparavant il avait demandé à tous les militaires de sortir de l’UCB, une organisation politique dans laquelle nombreux étaient ceux qui complotaient de la façon dont le décrit Thomas Sankara dans cette intervention.

Autre remarque, ce discours anéantit toute l’argumentation du Front Populaire qui consiste à dire que Thomas Sankara préparait l’assassinat de Blaise Compoaré et de ses amis. Nous aurions aimé pouvoir publier aussi la photo du texte car c’était écrit à la main, afin que vous n’ayez aucun doute sur l’origine de l’écriture. Sachez cependant que nous avons pu la voir et que le journaliste l’a aussi faite identifiée de son côté.

Bonne lecture et nous attendons bien sur vos commentaires car nulle que document très important va susciter une foules de questions et de réflexions.

Bruno Jaffré

Voici le discours:

Chers Camarades,

Le prestige de la Révolution et la confiance que les masses lui vouent ont subi un grand choc. Les conséquences en sont une remarquable perte d’enthousiasme révolutionnaire chez les militants, une sérieuse diminution de l’engagement, de la détermination et de la mobilisation à la base, enfin, la méfiance, la suspicion et partout, le fractionnisme au sommet.

Quelles en sont les causes ?

Il y a d’une part ce qui pourrait nous diviser et qui relèverait des questions profondes de fonctionnement des structures, d’organisation de la vie interne du CNR, des positions idéologiques et il y a d’autre part les questions de rapports humains entre les acteurs, animateurs que nous sommes tous. Mais, pour importantes que soient les questions organisationnelles et idéologiques, elles se révèlent dans notre cas avoir moins déterminé la situation présente. En effet, toute organisation connaît en son sein, un affrontement des contraires puis une unité de ces mêmes contraires. L’unité des contraires est toujours éruditionnelle, elle n’est jamais donnée une fois pour toute, elle est relative et temporaire. « L’unité des contraires est en conséquence absolue, exactement comme le développement et le mouvement sont absolus. » C’est pourquoi l’équilibre est lui même temporaire. Il peut être à tout moment remis en cause. Il nous revient de travailler à l’assurer à le préserver le plus longtemps possible, à le rétablir chaque fois qu’il aura été menacé, voire rompu.

Dans le cas des questions fondamentales organisationnelles et idéologiques, nous avons bénéficié du fait que chaque fois que nous avons estimé devoir émettre un point de vue différent du mien, défendre une position contraire à la mienne, vous l’avez fait en toute liberté et en toute confiance. Je l’ai adopté et appliqué, de même que les conseils, suggestions et recommandations. Du reste, et en règle générale, la résolution des questions entre les hommes est toujours aisée dès lors que règne la confiance. En effet, l’objectivité s’impose dès que vit la confiance. C’est dire que tant que la révolution sera régie par des principes, le débat franc, la critique et l’auto critique suffiront à dissiper tout malentendu, tout désaccord pourvu que s’impose la confiance.

Travaillons donc à développer la confiance et préservons-la de toute critique, de toute menace. A l’inverse des questions de principes, dont la résolution s’appuie aisément sur la confiance, les problèmes de rapports humains, subjectifs ne connaissent rien d’autre comme solution que la confiance totale. En cela, les intrigues de certains éléments de nos rangs ont fait plus de torts, plus de ravages en quelques mois, que les années des plus farouches affrontements politiques et idéologiques entre le CNR et des organisations adversaires de gauche.

Prenant leur appartenance au CNR comme la garantie inattaquable de leur label de révolutionnaire, ces éléments se sont crus la voie royale ouverte pour la réalisation de leur vision de la société, de la place qu’ils entendent y jouer, du rôle qu’ils s’y assignent. D’un coté la surenchère verbale de gauche, de l’autre une pratique de voyou. Tout cela dans la tranquille assurance que le CNR les prémunit contre toute attaque et que le parlementarisme de ce même CNR leur a ouvert des droits de minorité de blocage.

Ces droits, ils les utiliseront abusivement pour couvrir tous ces comportements licencieux indignes d’un militant révolutionnaire, mais que personne ne leur opposera sous peine d’être soupçonné de vouloir s’opposer au CNR. C’est de l’opportunisme !

A l’intérieur, le souci de ne perdre aucun militant, surtout les nouveaux venus, a plutôt nui à la fermeté et annihilé toute rigueur contre ce que chacun constatait comme étant de l’indiscipline et un discrédit préjudiciable à terme à l’autorité du CNR.

Tout le monde est témoin du dilettantisme, de la légèreté qui ont caractérisé les comportements d’éléments de cet acabit, et émaillé leur pratique sociale et militante. Le titre de membre du CNR a été utilisé par eux pour influencer les masses à des fins personnelles contraires aux intérêts de la révolution. Mais le plan criminel de leurs attitudes, c’est la paralysie de la Direction qu’ils ont provoqué en travaillant sans relâche à créer l’impression qu’ils se sont identifiés à certains dirigeants imminents incontestés parce que respectables et respectés.

Dés lors, et sous ce couvert ils pouvaient imposer et leurs caprices et leurs indisciplines sans crainte d’aucune mesure. Ils se sont autorisés toutes sortes de pratiques sociales, couverts qu’ils se sont estimés de l’immunité de « proches copains » de tels ou tels dirigeants. Leurs positions élevées dans les structures du CNR aidant, positions tirées non d’un mérite établi mais d’une répartition arithmétique entre groupes au CNR, ils ont de fait maquillé de vraisemblance leurs intrigues.

La révolution a beaucoup souffert de ces éléments-là. Incapables d’élever le niveau des débats, ils l’ont tiré en arrière. Ils l’ont rabaissé. Redoutant l’unité comme étant la fin de leurs « droits princiers de naissance », ils ont démobilisé partout où il y avait ne serait-ce qu’une certaine adhésion, et ailleurs ils ont jeté de l’huile sur le feu de la division.

Progressivement démasqués dans leurs pratiques, et objectivement et inexorablement engagés sur la pente qui les mène à leur perte, ils recourent de façon de plus en plus grossière mais de plus en plus assassine à la division de nos rangs, à l’opposition artificielle des dirigeants. Ainsi, ils détournent l’attention vers d’hypothétiques dissensions au sommet, pendant qu’ils se dérobent à leur devoir de ressaisissement et d’autocritique.

Ne cherchons pas loin. Le malaise actuel est la conséquence des comportements criminels non dénoncés parfois, non promis ? toujours. S’il y a opposition, ce n’est nullement entre ceux-là que l’on indexe : « les dirigeants historiques ». S’il y a opposition, c’est bel et bien entre ces éléments intolérables, incompatibles avec la rigueur révolutionnaire et la fermeté qui nous est dictée par l’obligation de toujours approfondir le processus déclenché depuis le 4 août 1983.
Le résultat de ce travail égoïste, lutter rien que pour soi au point de compromettre l’intérêt général, est que nous sommes affaiblis, en tout cas sérieusement ébranlés. Les rumeurs les plus folles ont embrasé les masses. L’opinion s’en émeut et s’en inquiète. La panique généralisée prédispose aux actions les plus insensés... que faire quand on est à ce point désespéré !

Gagnée par l’inquiétude généralisée, la direction politique se retrouve désemparée du fait que l’origine du mal est diffuse, et que la thèse de l’opposition, quelques dirigeants de premiers plan, ne convainc pas, quoique commode aux regards de la tradition de lutte aux sommets chez les vieilles gardes politiques d’ici. D’ailleurs ceux-là mêmes qui ont donné pour être des responsables en querelle s’interrogent vainement sur ce qui pourrait être le motif de leur opposition. Le danger, c’est que l’on est obligé de s’inventer une explication et une justification plausible, tant il est répété partout qu’il n’y a « pas d’entente entre les dirigeants. »

Jamais un point d’antagonisme ne nous a opposés. Qu’il y ait eu divergence sur des points donnés, cela est courant. Même la liberté, la confiance des débats entre nous qui exclue toute inutile retenue et faux tabous, n’ont pas relevé un quelconque antagonisme qui justifierait ou expliquerait une si subite et hypothétique mais persistante rumeur d’opposition.

Ces rumeurs, aidées par le désarroi généralisé ont réveillé les possibles de toute sorte d’opposition à la Révolution : les accompagnateurs de la RDP ? Aujourd’hui dégénérés, les tribalistes, les réactionnaires de la droite brute qui reprennent espoir. . .

Même nos ennemis à l’extérieur retrouvent leur agressivité depuis longtemps émoussée par nos victoires éclatantes, et poussent à l’audace des débris d’opposants réveillés pour la circonstance.

Camarades, nous ne pouvons pas permettre à quelques individus de se jouer de tout le peuple, faire condamner le CNR dans notre Patrie et auprès des peuples qui jusque-là respectent notre lutte. Nous ne pouvons pas et ne devons pas laisser quelques éléments irresponsables faire planer sur notre Révolution, le spectre des déchirements tels ceux du Yémen. Nous ne pouvons et ne devons les laisser pervertir cette révolution avec des conséquences telle l’impasse de Grenade. Nous ne pouvons pas fermer les yeux ou nous embarrassé devant les manquements de quelques intrigants lorsque tout le pays est menacé par la guerre civile à_la manière du Liban et du Tchad.

Nous sommes responsables devant notre peuple, mais aussi responsables devant le mouvement progressiste international du devenir de cet espoir qu’a suscité la Révolution du 4 août 1983.

...Cessons de nous lamenter à quatre ou devant une situation nationale si triste. Notre sincérité n’excuse pas notre coupable sentiment d’impuissance qui traduit plus le défaitisme. Je comprends que nous soyons choqué d’être qualifié de ce que nous ne sommes pas, d’être accusé de ce que nous n’avons pas fait.

Je propose :

1° / Que nous allions aux masses pour leur démontrer notre cohésion par des meetings de dénonciations et de condamnation des courants divisionnistes, en ridiculisant comme il le mérite, ceux qui jusque là ont prêché avec plus ou moins de bonheur dans les eaux de la Révolution troublés par eux. Il y a urgence que nous sortions, que nous parlions, que nous rassurions notre peuple. Il y a urgence.

2° / Eliminons de nos rangs les fauteurs de troubles. Toutes les luttes sociales ont connu des aventuriers frauduleusement introduits. L’histoire immédiate ou 1 histoire lointaine se sont changées de les éliminer. Notre révolution avancera en se purifiant. Nous ne perdrons rien à assumer le carnage révolutionnaire sentimentalement ressentis, dans le cas d’éventuelles séparations ne sera jamais rien par rapport à ce que nous endurons en ces jours, ni ce que notre peuple souffre en ces circonstances.

Je proposerai des sanctions.

3°/ Dans les meilleurs délais, il nous faudra mettre en
place :

• Les statuts du CNR, corrigés au regard de ce que nous enseignent nos difficultés présentes et prévisibles, l’acceptation et l’assimilation de la plateforme et des récents du CNR seront un critère éloquent à l’adhésion à sa ligne.

• Le programme économique, politique, social et militaire du CNR autour duquel nous rassemblerons les révolutionnaires sur la base de leurs mérites à contribuer au bonheur réel de notre peuple.

• Le Code d’Ethique Révolutionnaire qui décrira la conduite sociale la plus exemplaire vers laquelle chacun de nous devra s’efforcer de tendre.

A l’aide de ces éléments et grâce à une vie organisationnelle qui devra se départir de l’amicalisme, par un fonctionnement plus efficace de la Commission de Vérification, par des bilans périodiques sur ce que notre action a apporté ou non au peuple, nous parviendrons à faire du CNR actuel et de toute autre forme que prendrait la Direction Politique Nationale, un véritable Etat-Major où n’entrent les meilleurs des meilleurs, les révolutionnaires les plus sûrs.

La Patrie ou la mort, nous vaincrons.

Thomas SANKARA.

Lire la suite...